(v)
(v_i)
(version_industries)

Recent Work
_what
record sleeve for the los angeles-based band, big black delta.
_how
it's been over a decade now since jonathan bates called us and asked caspar to do all the artwork for a new band he was starting called big black delta. working with jon has been one of the things that has kept caspar sane over the years. when jon sends us new music it's time to put the pencils down, get up from our chairs and dance. these acoustic versions of some of the best big black delta songs were no less effective. the opening lyrics of the new version of "betamax" coming as they are from an older, wiser and more weathered mr. bates, somehow carry more weight than ever before.

the artwork came easy. jon and his team approved the very first draft caspar put together. the idea was to reduce the big black delta imagery to the simplest forms, and let those forms succumb to gravity's pull; as we all do in the end. in this way we hoped the artwork would appear to be as reflective on the past, aging and the nature of all things, as these new songs are.

you can listen to the record's first single here, and you can preorder the vinyl edition here.
_link
bigblackdelta.com
_tags
_what
poster for the feature film, great photo, lovely life.
_how
director amanda mustard contacted us out of the blue. her debut feature film, a documentary about her family's grim past, was about to premiere on HBO max. she wasn't happy with the posters that had been presented to her so far, and asked if we had any ideas.

the film is dark. it left us breathless at times. we knew we had to somehow touch upon this darkness from the confines of HBO vetted artwork. we presented a range of ideas and amanda chose the one you see here.

caspar made the poster in berlin by printing out many photographs from amanda's family archive and arranging them across a larger print-out of amanda's face. this collage was then itself photographed.

you can watch a trailer for the film here.
_link
imdb.com/title/tt11331792
_tags
_what
poster for the biofeedback feature film, vfc.
_how
writer / director charles s. roy flew from montreal to new york to personally screen vfc for us. vfc is, as he put it, a "next generaation horror cinema experience". rather more like a virtual reality experience, vfc is not a film in any conventional sense. however it is also nothing like virtual reality.

to watch vfc you have to wear a headset. it's a headset that does two unusual things. it monitors your biofeedback and it plays audio. however it doesn't play audio through your ears, it plays audio into the bone of your skull. the reason the headset monitors your biofeedback is because vfc's soundtrack changes based on how you are physically reacting to the film. this means that for every person in the cinema vfc is different sonically, based on how the viewer feels about it visually.

conceptually the reason for offering such a unique soundtrack to the film is because the film's story is about a virus that is transmitted by audio into the minds of scientists at a research facility. as the virus spreads the various scientists in the film start to lose their mind. narratively similar in some ways to the plot of the film the thing, vfc offers an ineffable cinematic experience. for example imagine if you can those moments when the soundtrack to the film appears to jump from the cinema speakers into your head - the bone speakers in your headset making it feel like the sound virus is leaping physically inside you.

charles and caspar discussed at length ways of describing this experience with a poster. many ideas were on the table and in the end charles went with the image you see here. to capture the ear charles conducted a photoshoot in canada with the film's star elisapie. the rest of the poster was made in berlin by caspar with a printer, a scalpel, a bowl of water, a sponge, a desk and a camera.
_link
imdb.com/title/tt14526332
_tags